Quipu Girok (Knot Record)

[GALLERIES] Lehmann Maupin

2021.2.18 – 4.24
Cecilia Vicuña

CECILIA VICUÑA Niña Mapuche, 1975-2021 Photo lithograph on mulberry paper with bamboo and red thread 30 x 20 inches Photo by Dan Bradica Courtesy the artist and Lehmann Maupin, New York, Hong Kong, Seoul, and London

Lehmann Maupin is pleased to announce Quipu Girok, an exhibition of new work by Chilean artist Cecilia Vicuña featuring her first “painted” quipu, a recent video, hand-painted prints, drawings, and an installation of precarios that will engage a dialogue between Korean and Andean textile traditions and techniques. An artist, filmmaker, poet, and activist based in New York, Vicuña’s work ranges from performance, to painting, to poetry, to large-scale installations that address pressing concerns of the modern world, including ecological destruction, human rights, and cultural homogenization. The exhibition marks Vicuña’s second with the gallery and is her first solo presentation in Asia. Quipu Girok will coincide with the Gwangju Biennial, which will feature a selection of Vicuña’s paintings from the 1970s and a number of textile prints. These prints are a recreation of a series of paintings on fabric that the artist produced from 1975-1977 as an homage to the women who served in the Vietnam War.

Cecilia Vicuña: Quipu Girok (Knot Record) Installation view, Lehmann Maupin Seoul February 18 – April 24, 2021 ​Photo by OnArt Studio Courtesy the artist and Lehmann Maupin, New York, Hong Kong, Seoul, and London

The title Quipu Girok combines ancient Andean language and Korean, loosely translating to Knot (quipu) Record (girok). The quipu—an Andean method of visual-tactile communication and record-keeping system involving the knotting of colored strings—has featured prominently throughout Vicuña’s oeuvre since the 1960s and 70s. In the artist’s varied renditions, the quipu becomes a conceptual and performative poem in space, an act of resistance based on Vicuña’s desire to recover the lost history of this ancient form of writing. The centerpiece of the exhibition, from which it takes its name, is Quipu Girok—a large-scale quipu installation comprised of columns of painted gauze (reminiscent of ancient forms of indigenous painting on weaving), silk polyester (hanbok), and cotton (used in traditional Korean textiles) that hang vertically from uneven bamboo sticks. Each panel of transparent fabric is painted using pigment and pastel crayon to create a multi-layered work inspired by a series of Solar paintings the artist created during the 1970s. These paintings, like the installation Quipu Girok, feature simplified marks and geometric signs and symbols that recall the very beginning of painting on textiles in the pre-Columbian Andes. For Vicuña, these early artworks (forms of visualcommunication) are “abstract in a very profound sense.” As with poetry, there is a general sense of what the image signifies while its specific reference point remains unknown.

Cecilia Vicuña: Quipu Girok (Knot Record) Installation view, Lehmann Maupin Seoul February 18 – April 24, 2021 ​Photo by OnArt Studio Courtesy the artist and Lehmann Maupin, New York, Hong Kong, Seoul, and London

Vicuña’s early Solar paintings also led to the creation of her ongoing series of small sculptural installations called Lo Precario (the precarious), visual poems that utilize feathers, stones, wood, shells, cloth, and other human-made detritus. These poetically tiny sculptures are often loosely fastened together with string, emphasizing their fragility and impermanence and giving the impression that the materials have assembled by themselves. In each precario, Vicuña combines objects gathered and sourced from her travels over the years, imparting a geographic and temporal ambiguity to these works. For the exhibition Quipu Girok, Vicuña will create one of her archetypal precario installations but will incorporate new elements. This new work, a hybrid installation comprised of precario sculptures, features precarios/drawings that incorporate line, gesture, and found materials on a single sheet of handmade paper, as well as a precario/video that combines a wire “vest” with woven butterflies and a video on an iPad. The video documents the artist’s performance wearing this vest while walking along the bank of the Hudson River, an ancient migratory route for Monarch butterflies whose existence is in danger due to climate change, pesticide use, and habitat loss. Vicuña describes her precarios as a form of prayer, “uncertain, exposed to hazards, insecure. From the Latin precarious, from précis, prayer.” Each aspect of the precario installation holds its own history, materiality, and language that offers a global understanding of the environmental effects of pollution and masses of post-consumer waste.

Cecilia Vicuña: Quipu Girok (Knot Record) Installation view, Lehmann Maupin Seoul February 18 – April 24, 2021 ​Photo by OnArt Studio Courtesy the artist and Lehmann Maupin, New York, Hong Kong, Seoul, and London

Video has played an important role in Vicuña’s practice as documentation of performances, components of installations, and poetic works in their own right. Much of Vicuña’s moving image work refers to the fragility of ecosystems and mourns the extinction of species as a result of human abuse. For Quipu Girok, Vicuña has included a recent video, Que la verdad despierte/ Let truth awake, which depicts a flag Ver Dad (1974/2020) blowing in the wind in Marfa, TX against the sound of Vicuna’s haunting incantations and music composed and performed by Ricardo Gallo. The imagery is a recreation of a 1974 drawing made while the artist was living in London, in exile from the Pinochet regime in Chile. Placed at the center of an eye is the Spanish word “ver,” which translates to “to see,” alongside the Spanish word “dad” in the palm of a hand. Put together “verdad” translates to “truth.” The flag, first exhibited at Ballroom Marfa in Unflagging (October 2020), is an offering for us to see the truth of this moment.

CECILIA VICUÑA Girl with Book and Gun, 1975-2021 Photo lithograph on mulberry paper with bamboo and red thread 30 x 20 inches Photo by Dan Bradica Courtesy the artist and Lehmann Maupin, New York, Hong Kong, Seoul, and London

Though composed of work produced within the last year, Quipu Girok is an exhibition rooted in history—that of Vicuña’s own practice, which includes the revival of lost or destroyed works, and ancient traditions in weaving, image making, and record keeping. The artist’s complex, ephemeral poems in space combine the history and tactile ritual of weaving and spinning with assemblage, poetry, and performance. As with all of Vicuña’s work, this exhibition is a poetic interpretation of time and place where global histories, ancient and contemporary memory, and multiple languages come together and where textiles meet in an act of generosity and love.

Lehmann Maupin
74-18, Yulgok-ro 3-gil, Jongno-gu, Seoul, Korea
+82 2 725 0094

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